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Tulpas thought forms and holographic minds

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Tulpa (Tibetan: སྤྲWylie: sprul-pa; Sanskrit: निर्मित nirmita and निर्माण nirmāṇa; “to build” or “to construct”) also translated as “magical emanation”, “conjured thing” and “phantom” is a concept in mysticism of a being or object which is created through sheer spiritual or mental discipline alone. It is defined in Indian Buddhist texts as any unreal, illusory or mind created apparition.

According to Alexandra David-Néel, tulpas are “magic formations generated by a powerful concentration of thought.” It is a materialized thought that has taken physical form and is usually regarded as synonymous to a thoughtform.

One early Buddhist text, the Samaññaphala Sutta lists the ability to create a “mind-made body” (manomāyakāya) as one of the “fruits of the contemplative life”. Commentarial texts such as the Patisambhidamagga and the Visuddhimagga state that this mind-made body is how Gautama Buddha and arhats are able to travel into heavenly realms using the continuum of the mindstream (bodhi) and it is also used to explain the multiplication miracle of the Buddha as illustrated in the Divyavadana, in which the Buddha multiplied his emanation body (“nirmita”) into countless other bodies which filled the sky. A Buddha or other realized being is able to project many such “nirmitas” simultaneously in an infinite variety of forms, in different realms simultaneously.

The Indian Buddhist philosopher Vasubandhu defined nirmita as a siddhi or psychic power (Pali: iddhi, Skt: ṛddhi) developed through Buddhist discipline, concentrative discipline and wisdom (samadhi) in his seminal work on Buddhist philosophy, the Abhidharmakośa. Asanga’s Bodhisattvabhūmi defines nirmāṇa as a magical illusion and “basically, something without a basis”. The Madhyamaka school of philosophy sees all reality as empty of essence, all reality is seen as a form of nirmita or magical illusion.
Tulpa is a spiritual discipline and teachings concept in Tibetan Buddhism and Bon. The term “thoughtform” is used as early as 1927 in Evans-Wentz’ translation of the Tibetan Book of the Dead. John Myrdhin Reynolds in a note to his English translation of the life story of Garab Dorje defines a tulpa as “an emanation or a manifestation.”

As the Tibetan use of the tulpa concept is described in the book Magical Use of Thoughtforms, the student was expected to come to the understanding that the tulpa was just a hallucination. While they were told that the tulpa was a genuine deity, “The pupil who accepted this was deemed a failure – and set off to spend the rest of his life in an uncomfortable hallucination.”

THOUGHT FORMS

A thoughtform is the equivalent concept to a tulpa but within the Western occult tradition. The Western understanding is believed by some to have originated as an interpretation of the Tibetan concept. Its concept is related to the Western philosophy and practice of magic.

MODERN PERSPECTIVE

In recent years, a subculture has formed online who create hallucinations or imaginary friends which they call tulpas. Most such people do not believe that there is anything supernatural about tulpas. A number of web sites explain the methods people use to create tulpas of this sort.

Chidambaram Ramesh, an Indian author and researcher, has mentioned in his book “Thought Forms and Hallucinations” that the creation of thought forms and other mental entities like Tulpa etc., is the result of holographic mind processing. Via

From Wikipedia

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